• 1947: The first CWS featured eight teams divided into two, four-team, single-elimination brackets. The two winners met in a best-of-three final in Kalamazoo, Mich.

• 1948: Four-team playoffs were changed to double-elimination tournaments. Again in the finals, the two winners met in a best-of-three format in Kalamazoo.

• 1949: The final was expanded to a four-team, double-elimination format and the site changed to Wichita, Kan. Eight teams began the playoffs with the four finalists decided by a best-of-three district format.

• 1950: An eight-team, double-elimination format coincided with the move to Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, Neb. This format would continue until 1988. The baseball committee chose one team from each of the eight NCAA districts to compete at the College World Series. This procedure would continue until 1954. Jim Ehrler of Texas threw the first CWS no-hitter against Tufts. Texas became the first team to defend its title after also winning in 1949.

• 1954: District playoffs were conducted to determine the eight CWS participants.

• 1960: Jim Wixson of Oklahoma State threw the second and last CWS no-hitter against North Carolina.

• 1972: CWS teams played a record eight one-run games out of 15 total. The one-millionth fan attended the CWS in Omaha.

• 1974: First year for the designated hitter and aluminum bat. Southern California won its fifth consecutive CWS.

• 1975: The championship was changed to a regional format with eight four-team, double-elimination tournaments. This also was the first year since the early ’60s that more than one team from a conference could compete in the championship.

• 1978: Southern California won its 11th CWS title, the most by any team.

• 1980: ESPN televised selected CWS games for the first time.

• 1983: The two-millionth fan attended the CWS in Omaha.

• 1984: CWS teams combined to score 228 runs a game, an all-time high.

• 1987: Oklahoma State made a record-setting seventh consecutive CWS appearance. The field was expanded to 48 teams. All 15 CWS games were televised live on ESPN for the first time.

• 1988: The eight regional champions were seeded into two, four-team brackets. Those two brackets played double-elimination, with the bracket winner’s then meeting in a one-game championship. CBS televised the CWS championship game for the first time. Stanford became the first team since Southern California (1970 to 1974) to successfully defend its title.

• 1989: Wichita State became the first team outside the states of Arizona, California, Texas and Florida to win the CWS since Ohio State in 1966.

• 1991: The three-millionth fan attended the CWS. CBS televised the CWS championship game plus Game No. 3 for the first time.

• 1994: Every CWS game was televised live on either CBS, ESPN or ESPN2. The only other time all games were telecast live was 1987.

• 1996: The 50th CWS was celebrated and a new $4 million press box opened.

• 1997: The four-millionth fan attended the CWS.

• 1998: The eight CWS participants hit a record 62 home runs and also set records for batting average (.318) and base hits (327).

• 1999: The 50th CWS played in Omaha was celebrated; tournament expanded to 64 teams.

• 2002: The five-millionth fan attended the CWS.

• 2006: The 60th anniversary of the Men’s College World Series. The six-millionth fan attended the CWS.

• 2007: Oregon State becomes the first back-to-back winner since LSU accomplished this feat in 1996 and 1997.

• 2008: Fresno State becomes the first No. 4 regional seed to win the College World Series in the 64-team format.

• 2009: The seven-millionth fan attended the CWS. The all-time attendance record of 336,072 was set.

• 2010: South Carolina closed out the last CWS at Rosenblatt Stadium by winning the national championship.

• 2011: South Carolina opens TD Ameritrade Park Omaha by winning back-to-back championships.

• 2012: The eighth-millionth fan attended the CWS. Arizona wins first title since 1986 and denies South Carolina’s third consecutive championship. 

Championship History
Record Books