Florida’s Sharrif Floyd must sit out two games and arrange repayment of approximately $2,700 to charity before he is eligible to compete, according to a decision Thursday by the NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff. Floyd did not compete Sept. 3 against Florida Atlantic and must sit out Saturday’s game against Alabama-Birmingham.

Floyd, a 6-foot-3, 295-pound defensive tackle, was named to the 2010 Coaches’ Freshman All-SEC Team. He had 23 tackles with 6.5 for loss.

The university declared Floyd ineligible for violations of NCAA preferential treatment rules, including receiving $2,500 cash scross several months from an individual not associated with the university. Floyd used the money for living expenses, transportation and other expenses. In addition, he received impermissible benefits prior to enrollment, including transportation and lodging related to unofficial visits to several institutions. Florida was not one of these schools.

Based on the mitigating circumstances in the case, the withholding condition was reduced from a potential four games to two. In its decision, the reinstatement staff cited the totality of Floyd’s circumstances, including his personal hardship that led to the impermissible benefits being provided to the student-athlete by someone other than a legal guardian or family member.

“We examine each situation carefully and consider all elements related to a student-athlete’s individual circumstances and the violation,” Lennon said. “This gives us the flexibility to tailor the conditions of reinstatement that take into account all details and are in the best interest of the involved student-athlete.”


The term “student-athlete reinstatement” describes the process used to restore the eligibility of a student-athlete involved in an NCAA rules violation.

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During the student-athlete reinstatement process, the staff considers a number of factors including guidelines established by the Division I NCAA Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement for the type of violations and value of benefits, if a significant competitive advantage was gained, the student-athlete’s responsibility for the violations and any mitigating circumstances presented by the school, among other factors.

When a NCAA rules violation has occurred, the university must declare the student-athlete ineligible and may request the student-athlete’s eligibility be reinstated. The NCAA staff reviews each student-athlete’s reinstatement request individually based on its own merits and set of specific facts.

The university can appeal any student-athlete reinstatement decision to the Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement, an independent panel comprised of representatives from NCAA member colleges, university and athletic conferences who are not directly affiliated with the university. This committee can reduce or remove the condition, but it cannot increase the staff-imposed conditions. If appealed, the student-athlete remains ineligible until the conclusion of the appeals process.