With college football season just around the corner, fans and analysts alike are examining teams’ schedules to see who will play where. While many focus on who teams will play, others know that where is just as important.

Football fans around the nation often discuss home-field advantage and the true impact it has on a game. With travel distances and screaming fans affecting how the game turns out, certain fields have developed into feared locations.

Regardless of how fans might feel about their stadium, numbers don’t lie, and since 1996, the following have produced the greatest winning percentages at home.

Ohio Stadium | Ohio State (.877, 121-17)

Built in 1922, this home of the Buckeyes’ was made to sit large amounts of people in a small space. Currently, it can seat over 104,944 people, and because of its horseshoe shape, those in the stands are closer to the field than in most, allowing this field to become overwhelmingly loud.

Albertsons Stadium | Boise State (.863, 107-17)

Maybe it is the blue turf field or the Broncos’ fans, but away teams visiting this stadium often leave disappointed. However, this is the smallest stadium on the list, seating only 36,387 people.

Boise State's stadium is known for its blue field.
Chris Steppig | NCAA Photos
Boise State's stadium is known for its blue field.

Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium | Oklahoma (.849, 101-18)

Ranked in the top 15 as one of the largest on-campus facilities in the nation, this stadium remains an always-growing location. Still, it holds almost 82,112 seats for fans, and records break often in Memorial Stadium, from rushing yards to the largest crowd watching a football game in Oklahoma.

Doak S. Campbell Stadium | FSU (.835, 106-21)

Currently able to sit about 82,300 people, the Seminoles’ home field proves to bring down even the most formidable teams. Much of the success on this field comes from FSU’s home-winning streak that lasted from 1992 until early into 2001’s season. For the 2016 season, FSU is preparing to break in a new jumbotron as the newest addition to the stadium. 

.@TimBrewster #HomeFieldAdvantage pic.twitter.com/Fsqtf0kggh

Autzen Stadium | Oregon (.829, 107-22)

This stadium is known for having some of the best facilities in college football. It has been voted one of the best places to watch college football, and the facility continues to expand, currently able to seat over 54,000 people. It includes a 10,000 square foot entertainment center, and it was featured in National Lampoon's Animal House as Faber College's football stadium

Ben Hill Griffin Stadium | Florida (.822, 106-23)

Able to hold over 88,548 people, “The Swamp” has often been recognized for the Gators’ ability to defeat visiting teams. Since its construction in 1930, this stadium also has undergone renovations to make sure it is a state-of-the-art facility.

Tiger Stadium | LSU (.814, 114-26)

In 2001, ESPN sideline reporter Adrian Karsten said, “Death Valley in Baton Rouge is the loudest stadium I’ve ever been in. The Bayou Bengals certainly have that advantage in Tiger Stadium.” With over 102,321 screaming fans attending games at Tiger Stadium, there is a reason it is referred to as “Death Valley.”

LSU's Tiger Stadium is often referred to as Death Valley.
LSU Athletics
LSU's Tiger Stadium is often referred to as Death Valley.

*Note: numbers taken from football.statsen.com. At least 100 games were required to be included in this list.