The looks on the faces of some of the parents and grandparents have stuck in the mind of Tim Daly years after the performances.

Daly, 22, is a senior defenseman for the St. Cloud State men's hockey team.

As a junior and senior in high school in Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Daly took a music class called "School of Rock."

"My high school music teacher formed the bands with people who had similar interests in music and you mostly work on cover songs," said Daly, who played drums in the band.

At the end of the year, there was a concert for friends and relatives at the school. The music that Daly's band was into was heavy metal.

"During the final concert, it was mostly people's parents and grandparents," Daly said of crowd with a smile. "My band went up there and our lead singer was screaming.

"It was pretty interesting to see the reactions and some of their faces. Most of the [other] bands were [performing] either soft rock or playing alternative [music]. They're playing Journey songs like 'Don't Stop Believing' ... and then my band comes up and it was definitely a shocker for some of the grandparents."

If you listen to the music of the bands they covered, you can hear why a grandparent may have had some interesting facial expressions.

The bands that Daly's band covered his first year were Job For a Cowboy and Dethklok.

His second year in the class, they covered music by High on Fire and Lamb of God.

Metal teammates

Daly said that his musical tastes were shared by former St. Cloud State goalie Ryan Faragher, who signed a pro contract after last season. The two were roommates for the past two seasons.

"We got along really well, especially in that aspect because nobody else here is really into that kind of music," Daly said. "Everyone on our team is all into country music or rap. I do not like that kind of music."

Daly started playing drums at "13 or 14." He has a drum kit at home and an electronic drum kit in his apartment in St. Cloud.

"The first days when we were rookies in college, we hit it off and it started with music," said Faragher, who is playing pro hockey in Anaheim's minor league system this season. "Halfway through the first year we lived together, his parents got him an electric drum set and he would plug in his headphones and play.

When Tim's on top of his game, he's a fierce competitor, an outstanding defender and he can eat lots of minutes in a game and critical minutes.”
-- Bob Motzko
"He would plug in his headphones and play with the songs. There were many, many nights where he's in there about an hour or two straight hours playing while I did my homework ... He'd come out sweating, have a drink of water and get back in there."

With Faragher gone, one of Daly's four roommates is senior defenseman Jarrod Rabey.

"Rabey's got a little metal in him," Daly said of his teammate's musical taste. "He kind of likes everything, which is why he usually controls the stereo in the locker room."

"We eventually turned Rabey into a metal head," Faragher said. "We started turning him to the dark side our freshman year. Last year, he was pretty into it like we are."

But Daly admits that his favorite music never seems to make the playlist.

A captain

Despite mostly a lack of musical camaraderie with most of his teammates, Daly was voted an assistant captain to the team this season. His personality and the characteristics he brings to the team helped him earn that.

"He's very well-liked and he should be," Huskies coach Bob Motzko said. "He's done a tremendous job of maturing and growing up. He's a very well-respected teammate and player in our program.

"I hear that he's one of the funnier guys in the locker room. I have yet to see it. He is not funny around me, so he must not like me."

Daly would agree with Motzko's assessment that he has matured.

"That has allowed me to become the leader I am," Daly said. "It's how you come ready every single day. You can't take a day off.

"The whole team looks up to their leaders and you've got to be the hardest working guys on the ice every single day. You have to have that in the back of your mind every day."

Daly has one goal, one assist, 10 penalty minutes and is a minus-5 in 16 games. The offensive numbers are in line with his career numbers. He has five goals and 11 assists in 119 college games.

He also leads the team in blocked shots with 36 after finishing second on the team last season (53 in 32 games) and has 143 blocked shots in his career.

"When Tim's on top of his game, he's a fierce competitor, an outstanding defender and he can eat lots of minutes in a game and critical minutes," Huskies coach Bob Motzko said. "He can be out there on the penalty kill late in games and you can line him against other team's top players.

"When he plays like that, he's a highly, highly valuable defenseman in this league."

And when he's trying to get a break from hockey or school, his drum kit remains an outlet.

"It's no different than playing a video game or watching TV," Daly said. "It allows me to be creative and I get enjoyment out of it."

And the memories of playing in those high school concerts remains a point of conversation with his friends back home.

"We still talk about it from time to time," said Daly, an elective studies major. "It's fun to reflect on the funny times that happened in the past."