UPDATE (Oct. 26): Texas A&M won with 70 percent of the vote.

Which trio reigns supreme in the Lonestar State?

The Longhorns boast four professional championships among their three representatives. The group of Aggies have six combined All-Star/Pro Bowl nods.

Read below to see who represents these two schools, then submit your vote on Twitter with the hashtags #UTTrio or #TAMUTrio.

Check out all the schools in our eight-team bracket | Yesterday's contest

TEXAS

 to vote

Earl Thomas, Seattle Seahawks | 2008-09

Thomas' time with the Longhorns included an AP All-American nod, a Big 12 championship, a Fiesta Bowl win and a runner-up finish in the 2009 BCS National Championship Game. Texas finished a combined 25-2 with Thomas manning the secondary. The 2010 No. 14 overall pick finished with 10 interceptions — including two returned for touchdowns — and totaled 135 tackles in two seasons in Austin. He then joined one of the NFL's most potent secondaries in the Seattle Seahawks, where he's been a five-time Pro Bowler and three-time All-Pro free safety. He won Super Bowl XLVIII in 2014.

Brandon Belt, San Francisco Giants | 2007-09

Texas Athletics

Belt began his college career at San Jacinto Community College before transferring to Texas in 2008. In two seasons in Austin, Belt belted 14 home runs and had 108 RBIs while slashing .321/.399/.510. In 2009, Belt was a key contributor for the runner-up Longhorns who lost to LSU in the College World Series finals. Belt was then drafted by the Giants in the fifth round in 2010 and he debuted in 2011. He's since won two World Series championships (2012, 2014) and was a 2016 All-Star.

Kevin Durant, Golden State Warriors | 2006-07

Texas Basketball | Twitter

Durant only spent one season in burnt orange, but it was a memorable one. He took home AP Player of the Year, Big 12 Player of the Year and All-America First Team honors along with the Naismith Award and Wooden Award. He was the first freshman ever to take home national player of the year honors. Durant averaged 25.8 points and 11.1 rebounds for the year, as the Longhorns reached the second round of the NCAA tournament. The small forward was then drafted No. 2 overall by the Seattle SuperSonics (now the Oklahoma City Thunder) and won the NBA's MVP award in 2014. This past season, his first with the Warriors, he earned his first NBA title and Finals MVP honors.

 

TEXAS A&M

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Von Miller, Denver Broncos | 2007-10

Before Miller became one of the most terrorizing pass rushers in the NFL, he was a four-year stud within the Aggies' front seven. He tallied 33 sacks and had 50.5 tackles for loss while shifting between defensive line and linebacker at Texas A&M. His 17 sacks in 2009 led the nation. Now with the Broncos, who drafted him No. 2 overall in 2010, Miller has recorded double-digit sacks in five of his first six seasons. This year, he's already gotten to the quarterback seven times and has one forced fumble. In the Broncos' Super Bowl 50 victory in 2016, Miller had 2.5 sacks and was named the game's MVP.

Michael Wacha, St. Louis Cardinals | 2010-12

Texas A&M Athletics

Wacha was 18-7 with 336 strikeouts in 348.2 innings pitched in three seasons with the Aggies. In his 2011 sophomore season, he helped lead Texas A&M to its first CWS appearance in 12 years. Wacha started one game in Omaha, pitching 6.2 innings of four-run ball, earning the loss against Cal. Wacha was a first-round draft pick after his 2012 junior season and debuted with the Cardinals just one year later. He emerged as a playoff hero and was named NLCS MVP in 2013. In 2015, Wacha went 17-7 and earned his lone All-Star nod to date.

DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers | 2007-08

Jordan finished his one season at College Station with 7.9 points, six rebounds and 1.3 blocks per game as a part-time starter for the 25-win Aggies who advanced to the second round of the NCAA tournament. Jordan then declared for the NBA draft and was selected 35th overall (second round) by the Clippers. In nine full NBA seasons, Jordan is averaging 9.1 points and 10.2 rebounds per game. The 6-11 center is a two-time All-Defensive selection and was a first-time All-Star last season.

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