Maryland 4, Hofstra 0

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COLLEGE PARK, Md. - The third-seeded Maryland Terrapins exploded for four second half goals to defeat Hofstra, 4-0, Tuesday night in NCAA Tournament action at Ludwig Field. Senior midfielder Domenic Mediate scored a pair of goals and junior defender Chris Lancos added two assists as the Terps advance to the Round of 16 for the third consecutive year. Maryland will be in action on Sunday, at 1 p.m. at Ludwig Field against either Northwestern or Creighton.

The loss ended Hofstra's (12-10-1) six-game winning streak and postseason run that saw it capture the Colonial Athletic Association title and its first-ever Division I NCAA Tournament appearance.

"Tonight I thought we put forth a complete effort and I'm proud of the way our guys played," head coach Sasho Cirovski said. "I think our defensive pressure wore Hofstra down. Hofstra is a great team. If you look at what they've done recently, if they would have done that earlier in the season they would've been in everybody's top 10."

The Terps (16-5-1) controlled the action from the onset, controlling the ball and creating opportunities. Maryland out-shot the Pride 9-1 and took five corner kicks in the first 45 minutes, but was unable to finish their quality chances inside the box.

"In the first half I thought we had some chances but we weren't as dangerous as we could've been," Cirovski said. "We talked at the half about getting the ball lower and framing the goal. The first words out of my mouth at halftime were `reward yourself.' We cleaned up a couple of things technically in the way that we attacked the final third and some goals resulted from that."

The Terps continued their strong play and took control of the game for good by notching three quick goals in just over four minutes. Abe Thompson got Maryland started on the first goal, charging up the right-hand side of the field through the midfield before dropping the ball off to Chris Lancos just outside the box on the right side. Lancos played a well-timed ball through traffic, and Jason Garey made a run in front of the goalie but let the ball go through to Mediate who was alone toward the far post for the score at 48:32.

"That was just a well-earned goal by the whole team," Cirovski said of the team's first score. Maryland is 13-1 this season when scoring first.

The Terps' defensive pressure proved to be too much for Hofstra as Maryland was able to generate its next three scores off of pressure on the Pride backs. Mediate notched his second score just over three minutes after his first when the Pride back line failed to clear the ball out of its own end. The loose ball came to the foot of Mediate who blasted the shot from just inside the box for the score.

"I really enjoy the tournament time," said Mediate, who now has six career NCAA Tournament goals. "This is what you work all year for, and every game is my last now."

Freshman Stephen King added his seventh goal of the season at 52:49 on a Hofstra turnover in the midfield to cap the three-goal run for the Terps.

"I thought the backs were effective in communicating where everyone should be," Lancos said. "We were most effective when we are able to force other teams into mistakes."

Lancos registered his sixth assist in his last three games after stepping in front of a ball in the midfield and sending it ahead to a streaking Garey. Garey finished on his 21st goal of the season with a shot that beat Hofstra keeper Matthias Gumbrecht in the upper 90. Gumbrecht had allowed just one goal in the Pride's last five games.

Maryland goalkeeper Noah Palmer stopped the two shots that came his way en route to his seventh shutout this season. The shutout was also Palmer's sixth in NCAA Tournament action. The Terp defense also shut down Hofstra's leading scorer Michael Todd, limiting the forward to just three shots.

"Our coaches made a point of letting us know that we needed to stop him, so all four backs knew whenever he was in a dangerous area," Lancos said. "We focused on shutting him down and not letting him turn and get any good looks at goal."



-- Courtesy University of Maryland