INDIANAPOLIS -- Emory took home its fifth-consecutive NCAA Division III Women's Swimming and Diving Championship and the seventh overall in the program's history on Saturday night.

Emory won the four-day championship meet with a final score of 595.5 points. Kenyon placed second with 456.5 points, while Johns Hopkins finished in third with a team score of 387 points.

2014 DIII Swimming & Diving Championships
Championship Gallery
Final Day Video Recap
Final: Kenyon comes from behind, captures 33rd title
Final: Emory wins fifth consecutive title, seventh overall
Women's: Final Results | Team Scores
Men's: Final Results | Team Scores
Saturday's Heat Sheets
Day 3 Video Recap
Day 3 (M): Pool gets competitive during Day 3
Day 3 (W): Emory enter final day, leads by 112.5
Day 2 Video Recap
Day 2 (M): Downhill from here, Denison leads at midpoint
Day 2 (W): Emory extends lead, searches for fifth title
Day 1 Video Recap
Day 1 (M): Weik wins national title, leads Denison
Day 1 (W): McDermott spurs Emory to lead
Emory has now claimed seven NCAA Division III Women's Swimming and Diving Championships (2005, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014) and 16 overall in the history of the Emory Athletics program. Women's Tennis has recorded five team titles, while men's tennis has won three, and volleyball one.

The Eagles were paced on the final day by sophomore Elizabeth Aronoff, who won the National Championship in the 200-yard breaststroke with a time of 2:14.37, breaking the previous school record of 2:14.62, set by former Eagle April Whitley at the 2011 NCAA championships. It was the 26th individual national championship by an Eagle (to go along with 13 relay national titles), and the first since senior Sadie Nennig won the 200 backstroke in 2012. Aronoff joins Whitley (2011) and former Eagle Julie Hogan (1985) as the only Emory women's swimmers to win the event.

Aronoff had company on the podium from her teammates in the 200 breaststroke, as the Eagles swept the top-three spots in the event. Junior Megan Beach claimed second with a time of 2:14.73, followed by freshman Annelise Kowalsky in third with a mark of 2:16.12. Adding a sixth-place finish to claim an all-America honor in the event was senior Kylie McKenzie with a time of 2:16.99.

Senior Courtney McDermott added a second-place finish in the 1,650 freestyle with a time of 16:43.79 her second individual all-America honor and third certificate overall of the meet. Junior McKenna Newsum-Schoenberg claimed sixth in the event for her third individual all-America honor, while sophomore Carolyn Bonfield claimed an honorable mention, finishing 11th with a time of 17:06.75.

Junior Nancy Larson claimed an all-America honor in the 100 freestyle, her individual certificate of the week, finishing third with a time of 50.33 seconds. Nennig rounded out Emory's individual swimming all-Americans with a fifth-place finish in the 200 backstroke in a time of 1:59.90 in the preliminaries, while sophomore Ellie Thompson won the consolation heat with a time of 2:00.82, earning an honorable mention.

Nennig finishes her Emory career with 17 all-America honors, tied with former Eagles Liz Horvat and Hillary Lane for the third-most in school history. In addition, she has now earned all-America honors in the 200 backstroke all four years of her career, in addition to claiming the honor all four years in the 200 individual medley, and joins Tess Pasternak, Ruth Westby, Liz Horvat and Anne Culpepper as the only Eagles to accomplish the feat in multiple events.

In the 3-meter dive, senior Sarah Greene earned the first all-America honor of her career, finishing eighth in the event after registering a score of 452.8- during the preliminaries.

Emory finished off the meet with a flourish, as the 400 freestyle relay team of junior Dana Holt, freshman Marissa Bergh, Newsum-Schoenberg, and Larson claimed third place with a time of 3:22.84.

All together, Emory earned nine individual all-America certificates, one relay all-America honor, and two honorable mentions, finishing the meet with a total of 23 individual all-America honors (including the National Championship from Aronoff), 17 individual honorable mentions, and all-America certificates in all five relays.