Minnesota State’s Myles Hunter checked the 60-meter hurdles record the night before.

“I’m very ambitious,” Hunter said. “I try to set goals for myself so I can have something to aim for.”

He already set the Division II record in 60-meter hurdles at 7.64 last season, and the Division II title record was next. Hunter burst past the hurdles Friday afternoon at the Division II indoor track and field national championship and won the preliminary race in the event.

More notably, he set the record time in the event at the national championship at 7.67, a record that has stood for 10 years.

“The main focus was just get to the first hurdle clean and get out in front,” Hunter said. “That’s what I’ve been practicing for the last two weeks. Just to get out clean and finish the race.”

Hunter added that he is looking forward to competing in the event’s final tomorrow. “I’ve got some good competition to run against, I know that will push me. I just want to have fun.”

MORE: Results from Day 1 of DII Championships

Four national champions were crowned at the meet Friday and final races were set for Saturday, March 12. At the end of the day, Grand Valley State held the lead in the team standings. Going into the final day of the meet, Shaquille Chattoo holds the lead for the men’s heptathlon with three events tomorrow.

After the Hunter’s record-setting afternoon, the long jump record was broken that evening, also by two hundredths. Sedeekie Edie of Lincoln (Mo.) set a previously untouched record with a jump of 7.97 meters. The previous record was set by Terrell Carpenter of St Augustine’s in 1989 at 7.95 meters.

Like Hunter, nothing but confidence flowed through the veins of Edie, who was hoping for a score of 8.05m in order to qualify for the IAAF World Indoor Track and Field Championships next weekend in Portland, Ore. But when he stepped up to take the jump, only one thing, Edie said, was on his mind. “Win.”

“[There was] no pressure at all. Because I know what I can do and I just do it,” Edie said.

Edie said he surprised himself with his distance after battling a hamstring injury for most of the season. This season, his previous long jump personal record was 7.59 meters. His all-time personal record was set last season at 7.65 meters.

“As my coach told me, the sky’s the limit,” Edie said. So I just had to go for it.”

While Edie and Hunter attracted attention with their numbers, only Edie’s Blue Tigers are close to the top in the team rankings. At fourth, they are eight points behind Grand Valley State for the lead. However, only four events were scored at the end of the day on Friday.

Grand Valley State and Ashland benefited from top performances in the weight throw, which is a big reason why the two are near the top of the Day 1 rankings. Grand Valley State ended the day on top with 18 points.

Ashland junior Jordan Crayon won the national title in the weight throw with a throw of 21.81 meters. His victory added 10 to his team’s point total. The rest of Ashland’s point total came from Crayon’s teammate, Bryn Campbell, who added five points with a fourth-place finish.

“Initially when I got going I realized I took myself out of my rhythm and going into round three I just told myself to relax, do what I do best, do what coach logan has told me to do. I was able to put something together in round three and round four I was able to secure that national championship.

In the fourth round, Crayon heaved the winning throw, which beat Central Missouri’s Caniggia Raynor’s 21.59-meter throw from the second round which was the previous best.

The win from Crayon continues a streak of dominance in the weight throw. Ashland has now won seven of the last 10 national titles in the weight throw. This title is Crayon’s first of his career.

Defending champion Adams State is also a powerhouse in cross country, and the Grizzlies came through in distance running at the end of the day to tie for second with 15 team points.

Adams State’s Sidney Gidabuday won the men’s 5000-meter run to add 10 points to the Grizzlies’ score. The relay team of Adams State ended the day with a third-place finish.

The remaining 13 events will be scored and a national champion will be determined Saturday. Although Day 1 provided excitement with two big changes in the record books, a team national championship is still far from decided.