Only one college baseball player has ever hit triple-digit home runs in his career — Pete "Inky" Incaviglia. In three seasons, the Oklahoma St. slugger averaged almost one home run every two games. In 1985, his junior season, Incaviglia hit 48 dingers and had a slugging percentage of 1.140 — both still NCAA records.

Here are the career leaders:

College baseball's career home run leaders:

Rank Player College Years Games Home Runs HR/G
1 Pete Incaviglia Oklahoma St. 1983-1985 213 100 0.47
2 Jeff Ledbetter Florida St. 1979-1982 262 97 0.37
3 Todd Greene Ga. Southern 1990-1993 240 88 0.37
4 Eddy Furniss LSU 1995-1998 265 80 0.30
5 Frank Fazzini Florida St. 1983-1985 234 79 0.34
6 Brad Cresse LSU 1997-2000 236 78 0.33
7 George Canale Virginia Tech 1984-1986 180 76 0.42
8 Chad Sutter Tulane 1996-1999 244 75 0.31
9 Matt LaPorta Florida 2004-2007 215 74 0.34
10 Cory Snyder BYU 1982-1984 173 73 0.42

 

In his final season, Incaviglia set the current NCAA record by breaking that of Jeff Ledbetter. Ledbetter, "nicknamed 'Treetops' for his blasts over the right field fence," according to Florida State, set the record for home runs in a game with four in 1982 (the record is now six, set in 1999). His 346 runs batted in still stands as the NCAA career record — 22 more than Incaviglia at second place.

Only two players in the Top 10 have played since the turn of the century, the latest being Florida's Matt LaPorta, who finished his career in 2007. The other is LSU's Brad Cresse, who had 78 home runs for the Tigers from 1997-2000, though his most famous hit happens to be a single that won the 2000 College World Series: 

It doesn't look like anyone will be breaking into the Top 10 anytime soon. The list of 25 current players with the most career home runs consists of 16 seniors and nine juniors. Samford's Austin Edens (senior) leads the way with 50 homers. He would need 23 more this season to tie for 10th place, but Edens hasn't hit more than 19 in a year during his career. No junior has more than 44 career home runs (Seth Beer, Clemson).

View the full list of active career home run leaders here.

Daniel Wilco has worked at the AJC, Sports Illustrated, and SEC Country. His writing has also appeared on SI.com, Men’s Health, and The Cauldron.

The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NCAA or its member institutions.