Jevon Carter has never been one to talk much about numbers, and said he's never stopped to worry about his place in WVU's athletic history.

MARCH MADNESS SHOP
His first assist today as the 21st-ranked Mountaineers (20-8, 9-6 Big 12) host Iowa State (13-14, 4-11), at 6 p.m. will have him in a club that stretches well beyond the walls of WVU.

Carter, the 6-foot-2 point guard, who could barely get a second glance from schools closer to home, will become the first player from a Power 5 Conference to reach 1,500 points, 500 rebounds, 500 assists and 300 steals in a career.

In all NCAA Division I conferences, only four players have accomplished the feat.

"You just look at how much effort he puts into his game, he's going to have a lot of good things happen for him," WVU teammate Daxter Miles Jr. said about Carter earlier this season.

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The achievement is not lost on Carter, and only he knows how many practices and workouts went into his development into one of the best all-around players in the country.

His focus hardly wavered along the way. His motivation was steady and strong.

Building a winning program came first. If it happened, the numbers would be there.

"I don't think I've really changed much as a person," said Carter, who will celebrate his final home game when the Mountaineers host Texas Tech, on Monday. "I just think I've become a better basketball player."

The numbers and accolades followed.

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It is simply a matter of where to begin.

Maybe start with his all-Big 12 defensive honors or his national Defensive Player of the Year awards last season.

Or with the fac the fact he is the school's all-time leader in steals and is rapidly climbing the list for most assists in a season and career.

Maybe none of that overshadows Carter's work ethic, which head coach Bob Huggins said has gone nearly unequaled by any player he's coached.

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"I think his work ethic pretty much covers everything," Huggins said. "It's film study on his part. He spends an enormous amount of time in the gym."

And then, Huggins said, comes the Q&A session with his point guard.

"The questions, obviously, are on his part," Huggins said.

The questions are always about becoming a better player or a better defender. Rarely are they about scoring, which has never been Carter's main focus in his development.

The rest is Carter being himself.

Asked what makes him tick, Carter simply smiled and shrugged.

"I don't know," he said. "I just go."

This article is written by Justin Jackson from The Dominion Post, Morgantown, W.Va. and was legally licensed via the Tribune Content Agency through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.