Nothing is guaranteed in March Madness, not even a 22-point lead in the Final Four.

That's the margin Duke overcame in 2001, setting the record for the biggest comeback in Final Four history.

RELATED: The highest scoring March Madness games in NCAA tournament history

Below, we've compiled the top seven Final Four comebacks, with backstory for each, and full-game footage tagged at the moment the comeback begins.

Duke vs. Maryland — March 31, 2001

Deficit: 22 points
Score: 39-17
Time remaining: 6:37, 1st half
Final score: Duke wins 95-84
What happened? The first time these two teams met in 2001, Maryland led No. 2 Duke by 10 with a minute to play. Then the Miracle Minute happened, with Duke winning in overtime. They faced each other again in the ACC tournament, where Duke overcame an 11-point hole to win in the final seconds. In the Final Four, the Blue Devils again found themselves trailing by double digits, and again rallied, outscoring the Terps 57-35 in the second half. Duke would beat Arizona 82-72 the next game to win the championship.

Seton Hall vs. Duke — April 1, 1989

Deficit: 18 points
Score: 26-8
Time remaining: 8:36, 1st half
Final score: Seton Hall wins 95-78
What happened? Heading into the 1989 tournament, Duke had gotten to the Final Four six times without winning a title — the longest such streak in the history of the tournament. Now, all they had to do was beat underdog Seton Hall to get to the championship game. The Blue Devils' Danny Ferry had 21 points in the first half, and Seton Hall was getting run out of the building. But in the second half, the Pirates shot 71 percent from the floor, and held Duke to 35 percent to turn an 18-point deficit into a 17-point win. Seton Hall would lose to Michigan 80-79 in overtime in the title match.

Loyola Chicago vs. Cincinnati — March 23, 1963

Deficit: 15 points
Score: 45-30
Time remaining: 14:00, 2nd half
Final score: Loyola Chicago wins 60-58 in overtime
What happened? Long before its Cinderella run in 2018, Loyola Chicago was an improbable underdog in the NCAA tournament. In 1963, Cincinnati was back in the championship game after winning the title twice in a row. They led the Ramblers by 15 in the second half. A three-peat seemed guaranteed. But a second-half rally forced the fourth overtime championship game in history. With just seconds left in overtime, the game tied, All-American Jerry Harkness passed to Les Hunter, who missed a jumper for the win. But Vic Rouse was there to tip in the rebound with one second on the clock, and the Ramblers were champions.

Duke vs. Florida — April 4, 1994

Deficit: 13 points
Score: 45-32
Time remaining: 17:58, 2nd half
Final score: Duke wins 70-65
What happened? Heading into the Final Four matchup in Charlotte, Duke had a strong homecourt advantage. But when Florida outshot them 48 percent to 36 percent in the first half, that edge disappeared, and the Gators led 39-32 at the break. Three baskets in a row to start the second half gave Florida a healthy 13-point lead, but Grant Hill and Jeff Capel led a charge back. With 1:08 left, Florida trailed 66-65 with the ball. Then Duke's Marty Clark stripped the ball, Cherokee Parks put back his own rebound, and Florida was called for a charge on the next play. The Blue Devils would fall to Arkansas 76-62 in the title game.

Kansas vs. Ohio State — March 31, 2013

Deficit: 13 points
Score: 34-21
Time remaining: 0:24, 1st half
Final score: Kansas wins 64-62
What happened? Kansas scored the first basket of the game, but wouldn't lead again until there was 2:48 left to play. A layup right before the halftime buzzer saved the Jayhawks from a season-low halftime total. But in the second half, Ohio State would miss its first 10 shots from the field, and Kansas would pick up all the momentum, taking the lead with under three minutes left. With 9.6 seconds to play, Ohio State's William Buford threw down a putback to bring Ohio State within one. One possession later, Aaron Craft would hit the first free throw to make it a two-point game, but committed a lane violation in an attempt to throw it off the rim and collect the rebound, sealing the game. Kentucky would beat Kansas 67-59 to win the championship.

Kentucky vs. Utah — March 30, 1998

Deficit: 12 points
Score: 45-33
Time remaining: 17:48, 2nd half
Final score: Kentucky wins 78-69
What happened? At the half, Kentucky was down to Utah by 10. No team had ever won the NCAA title after trailing by more than eight points at halftime. The Wildcats' hopes for redemption after a title-game loss to Arizona the year before seemed dashed. But the Utes would collapse late, scoring only four field goals in the final 16 minutes. Still, Utah had some life, scoring six points in a row to take a 64-60 lead with six minutes left. But they were out of gas. Kentucky's Cameron Mills hit a three, and Jeff Shepard followed it with a baseline jumper to take the lead for good. Kentucky's 78 points were the most Utah had given up all year, as Tubby Smith led his Wildcats to a championship in his first year as coach.

Duke vs. Indiana — April 4, 1992

Deficit: 12 points
Score: 39-27
Time remaining: 2:03, 1st half
Final score: Duke wins 81-78
What happened? Duke was a year removed from the program's first-ever national championship, but a repeat looked unlikely when Indiana took a 12-point lead with two minutes left in the first half. Then Duke shifted to another gear. They cut the lead to five by halftime, the start of what would be a 31-6 run that gave them a 13-point lead with 10:28 left in the game. But Indiana would mount a comeback of its own, cutting the lead to three points with less than a minute left, as the Hoosiers' Todd Leary hit three 3-pointers in 27 seconds. But Jamal Meeks' 3-pointer to tie the game with seconds left fell short, and Duke would go on to beat Michigan 71-51 in the championship game, giving Mike Krzyzewski his second title.

Daniel Wilco has worked at the AJC, Sports Illustrated, and SEC Country. His writing has also appeared on SI.com, Men’s Health, and The Cauldron.

The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NCAA or its member institutions.