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Jordan Guskey | NCAA.com | February 12, 2019

5 great college basketball players who wore No. 33

The greatest players to ever wear No. 33

Just 33 days away from Selection Sunday, it's the perfect time to run down some of the legends of college basketball who have donned No. 33.

Larry Bird

Before Bird won NBA titles and MVP awards with the Boston Celtics, he starred at Indiana State University from 1976-79. Bird finished his career with 2,850 points and 1,247 rebounds and in his final season led the Sycamores to a runner-up finish in the 1979 NCAA tournament. He still holds the program records for career points, field goals made and rebounds.

Bird was a consensus All-American twice and in his final season earned numerous player of the year awards. Indiana State has since retired his No. 33 jersey.

Magic Johnson

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Johnson's storied NBA career with the Los Angeles Lakers that saw him win MVP awards and NBA championships followed a two-season run with the Michigan State Spartans from 1977-1979. The Michigan native scored 1,059 points, dished out 491 assists and grabbed 471 rebounds in his college career. He topped it all off with a NCAA title in 1979 against Larry Bird's Indiana State Sycamores. That same year he also earned recognition as an All-American.

Johnson's No. 33 MSU jersey is retired.

Shaquille O'Neal

O'Neal's title-winning professional career spanned 20 years and a number of teams, although he'll be most remembered for his time with the Lakers, Miami Heat and Orlando Magic. That came after a career wearing No. 33 for Louisiana State University. As a member of the Tigers, O'Neal scored 1,941 points, pulled down 1,217 rebounds and blocked 412 shots. He was a two-time consensus All-American and two-time SEC player of the year who also earned recognition as the nation's top player for the 1990-91 season from the Associated Press.

The Tigers legend's jersey is retired.

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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Then Lew Alcindor, Abdul-Jabbar won numerous player of the year awards and earned All-America nods each season at UCLA. He won three NCAA championships as he amassed career totals of 2,325 points and 1,367 rebounds. And he lost just twice. All this before a 20-season NBA career with the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Lakers that included six MVP awards and six NBA championships.

His No. 33 Bruins jersey is retired.

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Patrick Ewing

Ewing's time wearing No. 33 for Georgetown included a national championship. He scored 2,184 points, grabbed 1,316 rebounds and blocked 480 shots. He earned consensus All-America recognition three years in a row. You can find him now on the Georgetown sidelines coaching his alma mater.

He was an 11-time all-star in the NBA and is most known for his years spent with the New York Knicks.

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