COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- The United States Hockey Hall of Fame announced its 2018 class on Thursday afternoon (Aug. 9) and legendary former Michigan head coach Red Berenson was among the five members who will be inducted.

The induction celebration will take place at the JW Marriott in Nashville, Tennessee, on Wednesday, Dec. 12, at 7 p.m. EST. Tickets for the event will go on sale on Monday, Aug. 13, at 10 a.m. EDT at USHockeyHallofFame.com.

Established in 1973, the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame was created to preserve the rich history of the game in the United States, while recognizing the extraordinary contributions of select players, coaches, administrators, officials and teams.

Berenson becomes the sixth Wolverine to be inducted in the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame, joining Vic Heyliger (1974), Willard Ikola (1990), John Matchefts (1991), Wally Grant (1994) and John MacInnis (2007).

Michigan went 848-426-92 (.654) during the 33 years of the Berenson era, including the 1996 and 1998 NCAA national championships -- the eighth and ninth in school history. Berenson's accomplishments behind the bench at Michigan put him among the greatest coaches in college hockey history.

Under Berenson, the Wolverines qualified for the NCAA Tournament in 23 of his last 27 seasons. His run of 22 consecutive appearances from 1991-2012 marks the longest streak in college hockey. In that time, Michigan reached the NCAA Frozen Four 11 times: back-to-back appearances in 1992 and 1993; four consecutive appearances in 1995, 1996, 1997 and 1998; three consecutive showings between 2001-03; 2008 and 2011. Besides 1996 and 1998, U-M also reached the national title game in 2011, losing, 3-2, in overtime to Minnesota-Duluth.

A three-year varsity letterwinner, Berenson is one of the top players in Michigan hockey history, earning All-America and Michigan Most Valuable Player honors in his junior and senior seasons (1961, '62). His 43 goals and nine hat tricks in his last season still stand as Michigan records. Berenson holds two degrees from the University of Michigan, his bachelor's degree from the School of Business Administration in 1962 and a Master of Business Administration degree in 1966

Berenson played in the NHL for 17 years as a member of the Montreal Canadiens, New York Rangers, Detroit Red Wings and St. Louis Blues. He accumulated 261 goals and 397 assists in 987 games -- the most career points by any Michigan alumnus in the NHL -- leaving an indelible mark on the history of the league. Following his retirement as a player after the 1977-78 season, Berenson served on the coaching staff of the St. Louis Blues and earned the Jack Adams Award as NHL Coach of the Year in 1981.

Berenson continues to be involved within the Michigan Athletic Department, serving as a special advisor to Warde Manuel, the Donald R. Shepherd Director of Athletics.

The 2018 U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame induction class also includes Hago Harrington, Paul Stewart, Natalie Darwitz and David Poile.

Harrington is the first American-developed player to record a hat trick in the NHL and had a prolific professional career with the Boston Bruins as well as a stint with the Montreal Canadiens.

Darwitz served as the team captain for the U.S. Women’s National Team from 2007-10 and is a three-time Olympic Winter Games medalist. She also accumulated records at the collegiate level, becoming a three-time All-American, breaking the University of Minnesota scoring record and setting the NCAA points record.

Poile ended the 2017-2018 hockey season as the longest-tenured general manager in NHL history and the winningest GM in NHL history with his 1,320th victory during the 2017-18 campaign. He also served as the general manager of the 2014 U.S. Olympic Men’s Ice Hockey Team and was the associate general manager for the U.S. squad that took home the silver medal at the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver. Poile also captained his college hockey team, Northeastern University, and was most valuable player for two of his three seasons.

Stewart is the first American to referee more than 1,000 NHL regular-season games, and the only American who played and refereed in the NHL after skating in 21 games with the Quebec Nordiques during the 1979-80 season. Stewart also serves as Director of Officials for the men's and women's leaguesin the ECAC. Stewart is also a cancer survivor and remains active in local charities focused on raising money for cancer research and children’s hospitals.